Channel One News ripping off CBS News? Remember when Ch1 promoted Red Bull to kids?

May 1, 2018

Channel One News copies CBS News content.

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From Jim Metrock:

Channel One News has a well-earned reputation for laziness and sloth.  If a young person wants to do as little as they possible and still be called a “reporter” there is only one place to go: Channel One News.

Let me show you something interesting.

Watch this video of a news story that recently appeared on Channel One News.

VIDEO: April 30 2018 Channel One energy drinks

 

It’s a truly sad story. Channel One appears to have written and produced a tight and well-written story. Channel One’s use of graphics helped make the story understandable for their young audience.

But wait… there’s something wrong here.

 

Nobody in the world of media cares about Channel One, so no one ever checks on what they do. That’s why I am around. I checked on this story and this is what I found.

On April 13, CBS News reported on this same story and produced a web article at https://www.cbsnews.com/news/south-carolina-lawmakers-consider-banning-energy-drink-sales-to-minors/

Energy drink sales to minors could be banned in South Carolina

South Carolina lawmakers are proposing a ban on the sale of energy drinks to minors after a deadly incident linked to high amounts of caffeine. Since 2012, it’s estimated that at least 2,200 Americans under 19 became ill after having an energy drink.

Last April, Davis Cripe, a 16-year-old sophomore, suddenly collapsed at his South Carolina high school. In the two hours prior, he drank a large soda, a latte, and an energy drink, reports CBS News’ Mark Strassmann. The medical examiner told his parents, Heidi and Sean Cripe, their son died from a “caffeine-induced cardiac event.”

“I was shocked. I was so hurt. That’s supposed to be something that’s innocent, that’s not supposed to be something that can take your kids,” Heidi said of learning an energy drink contributed to his death.  
 
Energy drinks can contain up to 300 milligrams of caffeine. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends adults consume no more than 400 milligrams per day or about five cups of coffee. By one estimate, 68 percent of adolescents consume energy drinks.

“Most of the cans they put a label on there that says ‘not recommended for children’ so I don’t understand why we’re selling them to children,” Sean said.

The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Medical Association urge adolescents to drink limited amounts of high-caffeine beverages – or none at all. Food toxicologist Dr. James Coughlin disagrees.

“Once you’re a young child you’re going to metabolize caffeine similarly for the rest of your life,” Coughlin said.  

In South Carolina, lawmakers have introduced a bill that would ban the sale of energy drinks to anyone under 18.  State Representative Leon Howard authored the legislation.

“We treat it just like we do alcohol. In the state of South Carolina, a kid can’t walk into a store and buy a beer or buy cigarettes,” Howard said.  
 
The South Carolina Beverage Association opposes the bill and says “a sales ban on any one product would be arbitrary and discriminatory.” 

But Heidi Cripe says her son’s death speaks volumes.

“We wish we would’ve had the facts. We wish we would’ve heard these stories and we just, just want to help save people’s kids,” Heidi said.
 
The Cripes feel they owe their son’s memory nothing less.

 

If you already watched Channel One’s video above, you already know the problem. To make the problem easier to understand, here is Channel One’s transcript from their April 30 report.  Words in bold appear to be similar to CBS’s content.

 

Keith: All right, check out these numbers. Since 2012, it is estimated that over 2,000 teens became ill after drinking an energy drink. 

Emily: Yeah, it is definitely a story we have talked about before, and now South Carolina lawmakers are pushing to ban the sale of energy drinks to kids and teens. 

Last April, 16-year-old Davis Cripe suddenly collapsed at his South Carolina high school. In the two hours prior, he drank a large soda, a latte, and an energy drink. The medical examiner told Davis’ parents that he died from a “caffeine-induced cardiac event,” which means he drank so much caffeine that it caused his heart to stop beating. 

Heidi Cripe: I was shocked. I was so hurt — that’s supposed to be something that’s innocent. That’s not supposed to be something that can take your kids.    

Emily: Energy drinks can contain up to 300 milligrams of caffeine. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends adults consume no more than 400 milligrams a day. That’s about five cups of coffee. And it is estimated about 68 percent of adolescents consume energy drinks.

Sean Cripe: Most of the cans, they put a label on there that says “not recommended for children,” so I don’t understand why we are selling them to children.

Emily: The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Medical Association urge young people to limit drinking high-caffeine beverages or drink none at all. And in South Carolina, lawmakers have introduced a bill that would ban the sale of energy drinks to anyone under 18.  

Representative Leon Howard: We treat it just like we do alcohol. In the state of South Carolina, a kid can’t walk into a store and buy a beer or buy cigarettes.

Emily: But the South Carolina Beverage Association opposes the bill and claims the law wouldn’t be fair, saying “a sales ban on any one product would be arbitrary and discriminatory.” 

Heidi Cripe says her son’s death speaks volumes.

Heidi Cripe: We just want to help save people’s kids.

Emily: The Cripes feel they owe their son’s memory nothing less. Emily Reppert, Channel One News.

Keith: Now, the law isn’t expected to pass this year but could move forward in 2019. 

 

Channel One News not only borrowed CBS’s writing, they also used CBS-produced graphics and of course there is no attribution. Channel One News is “hit-and-miss” on giving other media sources credit.

Now that’s not the end of the story.  Let’s not forget the terrible problem these two similar stories are calling to our attention: Young people consuming too much caffeine. Young people overusing energy drinks.

Who in the world would encourage young people to drink energy drinks?  You know the answer to that question already, Channel One News of course.  These kiddie marketers at Channel One will promote just about anything to kids if they can make a buck.

Several times in the past, Channel One has agreed to give Red Bull energy drinks unprecedented, in-classroom promotion in exchange for helping to create stories.  Yes, Red Bull would allow Channel One News to fly in their promotional airplane, but the Red Bull logo had to saturate the video. This arrangement would allow Channel One to proclaim they never ran Red Bull ads for kids, yet Red Bull would develop many more young customers after the Channel One/Red Bull stories aired. (Yes, there is a special circle in hell just for Channel One News executives.)

Check out this article http://www.obligation.org/2011-02-02-how-channel-one-news-cleverly-advertises-redbull-energy-drink-to-middle-school-students.

The more you learn about Channel One News, the more you want to get physically sick.

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